Simple Linzer Cookie Recipe that Packs a Powerful Austrian Flavor

Linzer cookies have been a long holiday tradition in my house. My dad used to bring a dozen up to my grandmother from the Danish Baker’s in Rockledge, PA, just outside of Philadelphia. I soon became addicted, as well as my mother-in-law, when I started to bring a box up to my husband’s family at Christmas too.

As we moved into the holiday season, I wanted a little taste of home, combined with my love of travel to Europe. We haven’t made it to Austria yet, but these beautiful cookies will make you feel like you are strolling through Linz with the kids covered in powdered sugar as they run ahead.

Linzer Cookies

Why were the Danish Baker’s Linzer tart cookies so much better than others we’ve had though? And yes, we have tried many different bakeries that serve Linzer cookies up and down the East Coast.

It was the crumble topping.

You know those Entenmann’s donuts with the crumb top, similar to a crumb cake topping? It’s sort of like that. So, now you not only have a jam-filled, nutty sandwich cookie, you also have an extra hit of sweet buttery brown sugar goodness melting in your mouth with every bite.

Linzer Cookies

It is believed that the Linzertorte, where Linzer cookies derive, where first made in the 1700s in Linz, Austria. Made with an almond crust (either using finely ground almonds chopped in the food processor or almond flour) and a bit of lemon zest and spices, this is a simple dessert that is beloved in this Western European country.

Austrian Linzer Tarts

Linzer cookies actually came out of the Austrian Linzer tart, a larger version of this beloved sandwich cookie. The Linzertorte has a nutty pastry crust and criss cross lattice top, with raspberry jam or black current filling up the center.

Allergies and Substitutions

You can use different nuts, such as hazelnuts, walnuts and pecans, but almond tends to be the most traditional.

Excluding the nut base doesn’t really make it a linzer cookie anymore, although those with nut allergies will still enjoy this sandwich cookie, by substituting the nut flour with all-purpose flour. You just won’t get the nutty flavor.

Those who are gluten intolerant can substitute the all-purpose flour with one-to-one flour, although the texture will be a bit different.

Linzer Cookies

Linzer Tart Filling Ideas

  • Raspberry jam
  • Strawberry jam
  • Blackberry jam
  • Lingonberry jam
  • Huckleberry jam
  • Cherry preserves
  • Apple Butter
  • Pumpkin Butter
Linzer Cookies

The traditional Linzer cookies are normally round, stars or heart shaped, but if you are like me and have a ton of cookie cutters laying around from Christmas, you can do almost any shape you like. The simpler the better though, and you need enough surface to cut a smaller shape in the middle.

  • Circle
  • Star
  • Heart Shape
  • Snowflake
  • Square
  • Gingerbread men
  • Trains
  • Trees
  • Flowers
Linzer Cookies

This sandwich cookie recipe may seem simple, but when you go to make your own Linzer cookies, keep in mind that the dough needs to stay cool or everything starts to melt and fall apart. If you are struggling, just pop the dough back into the refrigerator to firm up a bit.

If you have trouble getting the center cookie cut dough our of your cookie cutter, use a chopstick or metal straw to pop it out. Other than that, as long as you have a well floured surface, you should be enjoying these Linzer tart cookies by lunch.

Linzer Cookies
  • 3/4 cup almond flour
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp ground clove
  • 1 cup unsalted butter, cubed and at room temperature
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 2 egg yolks
  • Zest of one lemon (or 2 tbsp lemon juice)
  • Raspberry jam (or filling of choice)
  • Powdered sugar
Linzer Cookies
  1. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper and set aside.
  2. Sift together the almond flour, all-purpose flour, cinnamon, clove and salt, whisking if necessary to incorporate. Set aside.
  3. In a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, cream together the butter and sugar, beating for 2-3 minutes until light and fluffy.
  4. Add the egg yolks, vanilla and lemon zest (or lemon juice), mixing on medium until just combined.
  5. Gradually add in the flour mixture, 1/2 cup at a time, mixing on low until just combined.
  6. Turn the dough out onto the counter, kneading it a few times.
  7. Divide the dough into four equal parts, flattening each into a disc shape and wrapping each in plastic wrap.
  8. Refrigerate the Linzer cookie dough for at least one hour (max 2 hours).
  9. Preheat your oven to 325°F (you can preheat the oven to 350 degrees, but I found it browned my cookies too quickly).
  10. Dust your countertop or work surface with a heavy dose of white flour.
  11. Remove one disc of cookie dough from the fridge at a time, setting the plastic wrap aside.
  12. Place dough on your floured surface, sprinkling flour on the top of the dough.
  13. Using a rolling pin, roll the dough into a 1/4 inch thick square or circle.
  14. With your cookie cutter of choice, cut out a cookie and place it on your parchment lined cookie sheet.
  15. Continue to cut out cookie shapes until you only have scraps of dough left.
  16. Pull together your scraps, put them back in the refrigerator to chill if they start to stick to your surface too much, and roll the dough back out to make more cookies.
  17. Repeat with all of your discs.
  18. Set aside HALF of your cookies, and use a smaller cookie cutter to cut a shape into the middle of your larger cookie cut out. This is the top cookie in your Linzer sandwich cookie. You can add that smaller cookie back into your cookie dough pile you are using to make more cookies, or bake up these tiny cookies for an extra treat.
  19. Stick your cut out Linzer cookies on the cookie sheets into the freezer for about 5-10 minutes. This way they will retain their shape.
  20. Bake your cookies for 12 minutes, adding time as needed, until your Linzer cookies are just starting to get golden brown on the bottom and edges. You do not want an over baked cookie or they won’t be soft inside.
  21. (Optional step) As soon as the cookies are out of the oven, sprinkle the TOP cookies with your crumble mixture (recipe below).
  22. Allow cookies to cool for 5 minutes on the cookie sheet before moving to a wire rack to cool completely.
  23. Once cool, dust the top cookies with powdered sugar (I put powdered sugar into a very small mesh strainer and shake it around over the cookies for a more even sprinkle).
  24. One the flat side of your bottom cookie, spoon about a teaspoon of jam into the center and use the back of the spoon to spread it around, almost to the edge of the cookie.
  25. Place the a top cookie on the jam covered bottom of the cookie, powdered sugar and crump toping side up.
  26. You can add a dab more jam (or filling) into the smaller cookie hole window if you like, either with a spoon or piping bag.
  27. Stores in an airtight container for about a week, but they are always best the first 2-3 days.
Linzer Cookies

Linzer Crumb Topping (optional)

  • 1/2 packed dark brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 cup + 3 tbsp all-purpose flour

In a sauce pan, melt the butter on low heat. Stir in the brown sugar, vanilla, cinnamon and salt, stirring until combined. Add the flour and stir, cooking for 3-5 minutes to get that flour taste out.

Spread over a parchment lined cookie sheet to cool. Save extra in an airtight container.

Pin it and start baking!

Yield: 30

Linzer Cookies

Linzer Cookies

Linzer cookies actually came out of the Austrian Linzer tart, a larger version of this beloved sandwich cookie. The Linzertorte has a nutty pastry crust and criss cross lattice top, with raspberry jam or black current filling up the center.

Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 12 minutes
Chill Time 1 hour 10 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 52 minutes

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup almond flour
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp ground clove
  • 1 cup unsalted butter, cubed and at room temperature
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 2 egg yolks
  • Zest of one lemon (or 2 tbsp lemon juice)
  • Raspberry jam (or filling of choice)
  • Powdered sugar

LINZER CRUMB TOPPING

  • 1/2 packed dark brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 cup + 3 tbsp all-purpose flour

Instructions

  1. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper and set aside.
  2. Sift together the almond flour, all-purpose flour, cinnamon, clove and salt, whisking if necessary to incorporate. Set aside.
  3. In a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, cream together the butter and sugar, beating for 2-3 minutes until light and fluffy.
  4. Add the egg yolks, vanilla and lemon zest (or lemon juice), mixing on medium until just combined.
  5. Gradually add in the flour mixture, 1/2 cup at a time, mixing on low until just combined.
  6. Turn the dough out onto the counter, kneading it a few times.
  7. Divide the dough into four equal parts, flattening each into a disc shape and wrapping each in plastic wrap.
  8. Refrigerate the Linzer cookie dough for at least one hour (max 2 hours).
  9. Preheat your oven to 325°F (you can preheat the oven to 350 degrees, but I found it browned my cookies too quickly).
  10. Dust your countertop or work surface with a heavy dose of white flour.
  11. Remove one disc of cookie dough from the fridge at a time, setting the plastic wrap aside.
  12. Place dough on your floured surface, sprinkling flour on the top of the dough.
  13. Using a rolling pin, roll the dough into a 1/4 inch thick square or circle.
  14. With your cookie cutter of choice, cut out a cookie and place it on your parchment lined cookie sheet.
  15. Continue to cut out cookie shapes until you only have scraps of dough left.
  16. Pull together your scraps, put them back in the refrigerator to chill if they start to stick to your surface too much, and roll the dough back out to make more cookies.
  17. Repeat with all of your discs.
  18. Set aside HALF of your cookies, and use a smaller cookie cutter to cut a shape into the middle of your larger cookie cut out. This is the top cookie in your Linzer sandwich cookie. You can add that smaller cookie back into your cookie dough pile you are using to make more cookies, or bake up these tiny cookies for an extra treat.
  19. Stick your cut out Linzer cookies on the cookie sheets into the freezer for about 5-10 minutes. This way they will retain their shape.
  20. Bake your cookies for 12 minutes, adding time as needed, until your Linzer cookies are just starting to get golden brown on the bottom and edges. You do not want an over baked cookie or they won't be soft inside.
  21. (Optional step) As soon as the cookies are out of the oven, sprinkle the TOP cookies with your crumble mixture (recipe below).
  22. Allow cookies to cool for 5 minutes on the cookie sheet before moving to a wire rack to cool completely.
  23. Once cool, dust the top cookies with powdered sugar (I put powdered sugar into a very small mesh strainer and shake it around over the cookies for a more even sprinkle).
  24. One the flat side of your bottom cookie, spoon about a teaspoon of jam into the center and use the back of the spoon to spread it around, almost to the edge of the cookie.
  25. Place the a top cookie on the jam covered bottom of the cookie, powdered sugar and crump toping side up.
  26. You can add a dab more jam (or filling) into the smaller cookie hole window if you like, either with a spoon or piping bag.
  27. Stores in an airtight container for about a week, but they are always best the first 2-3 days.

Optional: LINZER CRUMB TOPPING

  1. In a sauce pan, melt the butter on low heat.
  2. Stir in the brown sugar, vanilla, cinnamon and salt, stirring until combined.
  3. Add the flour and stir, cooking for 3-5 minutes to get that flour taste out.
  4. Spread over a parchment lined cookie sheet to cool. Save extra in an airtight container.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Skip to Recipe
Scroll to Top